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Chapter 10
PLANT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

This chapter reviews the plant operations and maintenance functions of Houston Community College System (HCCS) in the following sections:

A. Organization and Management
B. Facilities Condition and Planning
C. Construction Program Management
D. Custodial and Maintenance Operations
E. Energy and Conservation Management
F. Safety and Security

Facility planning and management of construction and renovation projects are significant activities for most colleges or universities. Comprehensive master planning for facilities (based on projected student enrollment program needs and legislative requirements) meets student needs without overcrowding, use of substandard facilities because of deferred maintenance or non-compliance with applicable codes. Active management of construction projects ensures cost control, quality workmanship and timely completion. Facilities must also be maintained and cleaned on a routine basis to ensure a safe and healthy environment for students, teachers and staff.

Community colleges are the only segments of higher education that construct and maintain physical facilities without state funding assistance. Local community colleges have taxing authority for this purpose. For this reason, most Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) facilities standards and reporting requirements for other areas of public higher education are recommended, but not required, for community colleges. As a result, each community college system determines, to a large extent, its own facilities management plan.

BACKGROUND

HCCS occupies five academic campuses and one main administrative center in the metropolitan Houston area. The system owns facilities at all five of the colleges, which include Central College, Northeast College, Northwest College, Southeast College and Southwest College. It also owns the Main Administration Building at 3100 Main Street. In addition to the HCCS-owned campuses, the system leases eight buildings for additional classroom space.

The total physical plant consists of 3,020,911 gross square feet (GSF). Forty one permanent academic buildings totaling 2,101,507 GSF, and four buildings, used for administrative or non-academic purposes totaling 919,404 GSF. Lease facilities make up 249,194 GSF.

HCCS continues to expand, renovate and improve its academic facilities to support its educational programs in its service area. Construction is underway on the new 36,687 GSF Central College campus, located at Highway 288, with occupancy scheduled for fall 2003.

Exhibit 10-1 shows a summary of owned and leased square footage.

Exhibit 10-1
HCCS Owned and Leased Square Feet
2002

Building Address SF Ownership Occupancy
CENTRAL COLLEGE CAMPUS
288 Campus 288 and Airport 36,687 Owned Fall 2003
Business Careers Center 1215 Holman 35,000 Owned 1978
Business Careers Center II 1215 Holman 36,680 Owned 1986
Child Development Center 3412 Crawford 3,000 Owned 1988
Fine Arts 3517 Austin 75,400 Owned 1988
Fine Arts Parking Garage 3517 Austin 142,500 Owned 1988
Heinen Theater 3517 Austin 18,000 Owned 1988
J.B. Whiteley 1301 Alabama 102,000 Owned 1988
Palm Center 5330 Griggs 12,000 Leased 1997
San Jacinto Memorial 1300 Holman 172,000 Owned 1988
San Jacinto Memorial-East 1300 Hoffman 60,500 Owned 1988
San Jacinto Memorial-West 1300 Holman 60,500 Owned 1988
Staff Instructional Services 3821 Caroline 21,800 Owned 1984
Theatre One 3517 Austin 21,900 Owned 1988
Total Gross Square Feet Area 797,967  
NORTHEAST COLLEGE CAMPUS
Codwell Hall Northeast 555 Community College 86,316 Owned Fall 1999
Roland Smith Truck Driving 555 Community College 12,000 Owned Fall 1999
Northline Mall Center 401 Northline Mall 80,500 Leased Fall 1990
Pinemont Center 1275 Pinemont 40,025 Leased Fall 1999
Transportation Training Center A 4638 Airline 53,658 Owned Fall 1987
Transportation Training Center B 4638 Airline 18,401 Owned Fall 1988
Total Gross Square Feet Area 290,900  
NORTHWEST COLLEGE CAMPUS
Town & Country Classrooms 1010 W. Sam Houston 84,796 Owned Fall 1999
Town & Country PAC 1010 W. Sam Houston 26,123 Owned Spring 2000
Town & Country - Labs 1010 W. Sam Houston 14,000 Owned Fall 2002
Town & Country (Vacant) 1010 W. Sam Houston 10,000 Owned n/a
Westgate 1550 Fox Lake 62,645 Leased Fall 1996
Total Gross Square Feet Area 197,564  
SOUTHEAST COLLEGE CAMPUS
Coleman Medical Careers 1900 Galen Drive 160,460 Owned Fall 1999
Eastside Campus - Angela 6815 Rustic 60,640 Owned Fall 1999
Eastside Campus - Felix 6815 Rustic 54,345 Owned Fall 1990
Eastside Annex 2524 Garland 12,800 Owned Spring 1991
Eastside Temporary Buildings 2524 Garland 5,000 Owned Spring 1995
Total Gross Square Feet Area 293,245  
SOUTHWEST COLLEGE CAMPUS
Alief Center 13803 Bissonnet 43,000 Owned Spring 2001
Bluebonnet - Applied 4014 Bluebonnet 19,324 Leased 1996
Greenbriar Square Center 13645 Murphy Road 17,100 Leased 1992
Gulfton Center 5407 Gulfton 35,100 Owned 1990
Missouri City Center 1681 Cartwright 5,600 Leased 1997
Power Center 12401 S. Post Oak Rd. 12,000 Leased 1995
Scarcella Science and Tech. 10141 Cash Road 75,000 Owned Spring 1998
Stafford Campus A 9910 Cash Road 10,875 Owned 1992
Stafford Campus B 9911 Cash Road 23,560 Owned 1992
Stafford Campus C 9912 Cash Road 3,900 Owned 1992
Stafford Campus D 9913 Cash Road 3,900 Owned 1992
Stafford Campus E 9914 Cash Road 480 Owned 1992
Stafford Campus F 9915 Cash Road 2,880 Owned 1992
West Loop Center 610 West Loop North 73,000 Owned Spring 1999
West Loop Center - Vacant 610 West Loop North 126,000 Owned n/a
West Loop Center - Vacant 610 West Loop North 70,112 Owned n/a
Total Gross Square Feet Area 521,831  
SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION
System Administration 3100 Main 320,944 Owned n/a
Tenant Space 3100 Main 109,800 Owned n/a
Parking Garage 3220 Main 488,660 Owned n/a
Total Gross Square Feet Area 919,404  
Campus Total 2,101,507  
Administrative Total 919,404 Owned Leased
Total Area 3,020,911 2,771,717 249,194
Source: HCCS, Acting executive director of Facilities, Analysis Matrix, Building List, November 2002.

Prior to 1997, HCCS offered a significant majority of its programs and classes in the evenings and on weekends in facilities provided by Houston Independent School District (HISD) high schools. Starting in 1997, the HCCS facility inventory began transition to system-owned and operated campuses throughout the district. From 833,339 GSF in 1989, the system's instructional space has grown to 2,101,507 in 2002. Exhibit 10-2 shows the historical growth in space at HCCS.

Exhibit 10-2
HCCS Growth of Primary Building Space in Gross Square Feet

Location Prior to
1990
1990-1995 1996-1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
Central College 761,280 0 0 0 0 0 0 36,687
Northeast College 72,059 80,500 0 138,341 0 0 0 0
Northwest College 0 0 62,645 94,796 26,123 0 14,000 0
Southeast College 0 72,145 0 221,100 0 0 0 0
Southwest College 0 109,795 99,924 269,112 0 43,000 0 0
Subtotal 833,339 262,440 162,569 723,349 26,123 43,000 14,000 36,687
Grand Total 2,101,507
Source: HCCS, Acting executive director of Facilities, Analysis Matrix, Building List, November 2002.

THECB projects that HCCS full-time equivalent (FTE) student enrollment will steadily increase to 51,628 by 2015. This represents a 77 percent growth increase from HCCS' fall 2001 FTE enrollment of 29,176 students.

Exhibit 10-3 shows fall enrollment projections from 2001 to 2015.

Exhibit 10-3
HCCS Enrollment Projections to 2015

Location 2001* 2002* 2003 2004 2005 2010 2015
Central College FTEs 7,049 7,087 7,646 7,934 8,220 9,719 11,455
Northeast College FTEs 4,263 4,401 4,594 4,766 4,937 5,907 7,073
Northwest College FTEs 6,012 6,254 6,358 6,598 6,863 8,353 10,108
Southeast College FTEs 3,670 4,095 3,958 4,125 4,305 5,378 6,799
Southwest College FTEs 8,182 8,574 9,157 9,605 10,071 12,784 16,192
Total Campus FTEs 29,176 30,411 31,713 33,028 34,395 42,141 51,627
Source: HCCS, End-of-Term Fall 2002 and Fall 2003 Data Marts for unduplicated headcount by campus and college of attendance; HCCS, FTEs Enrollment Projections, May 2002; HCCS, Ten-Year Facilities Master Plan Update for capacities, July 2001; Census 2000 Redistricting Data for Adult populations, released March 2001; and THECB, Closing the Gaps Projections, May 2001.
* 2001 and 2002 Fall Enrollments are actual FTE Enrollments.

HCCS generates revenue from state reimbursement, local property tax and tuition. Since state funds do not finance capital expenditures for construction, the system funds it capital construction through bonds repaid by student fees. If designated through a general obligation bond election, tax revenue can be used for the construction of facilities; however, tax revenue cannot be used to make debt service payments for student revenue bonds. The system plans to issue general obligation bonds in 2003 or 2004 to fund additional expansion and facilities development.

From 1997 to 2001, almost $200 million in student revenue bonds have been issued by HCCS for real estate and building acquisition, new facilities construction and building renovations. Exhibit 10-4 shows student revenue bonds and their uses from 1997 to 2001.

Exhibit 10-4
HCCS Student Revenue Bonds and Purpose

Year Bond Amount
(in Millions)
Use of Proceeds
1997 $23.0 Construct West Loop Campus
1998 $50.0 Construct Codwell, Coleman and Morales (Eastside Annex) Facilities
1999 $50.0 Acquire 3100 Main Building and Construct Highway 288 Campus
2000 $8.4 Complete Renovations at 3100 Main
2001 $30.0 Renovation of Central Campus
2001 $38.0 Defeasance of 1997 Bond Issue
Total $199.4  
Source: HCCS, Interview with vice chancellor for Finance and Administration, November 2002.